Reviews for Faking It

Faking It is an excellent middle school read…Will is a believable, everyday kid and not a miniature Sherlock Holmes…the story line remains vivid and realistic right up to the end.”
D. Donovan, Senior Reviewer, Midwest Book Review

“[Faking It] is a tale of friendship and perseverance that will appeal to mystery-loving young readers.”
Kirkus Reviews

“Entertaining and inspiring, this is an enjoyable and exciting read, one I’d recommend to both young adult and older readers.”
Ruffina Oserio for Readers’ Favorite (5 STARS)

NE Book Festival 2015 YA Award!

January 15, 2016–The New England Book Festival has recognized Chelsea Creek to Bunker Hill: Spring 1775 as the 2015 Honorable Mention in the category of Young Adult Fiction! Visit their website to see a complete list of the festival’s award-winning titles.
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Midwest Book Review of Chelsea Creek to Bunker Hill

“Middle grade readers will find learning early American history a snap because this novel is fueled with the passions, family challenges, and concerns of young protagonists on the cusp of adulthood who find that the politics of their times is taking over their lives, options and choices.

“Young readers will come to understand the personal struggles behind historical facts and will find Chelsea Creek to Bunker Hill: Spring 1775 a powerful saga of the legacy of battle and the concerns of those who became mired in political and military struggles.” — D. Donovan, Senior Reviewer, Midwest Book Review

Read the full review…

Portsmouth Herald review by J. Dennis Robinson

Chelsea Creek to Bunker Hill: Spring 1775

“Seacoast author Terri DeMitchell continues to bring the story [of the raid at Ft. William and Mary] to life for young readers. Her first juvenile novel, The Portsmouth Alarm, placed three fictional boys in the thick of the battle. DeMitchell, a lawyer and former teacher, has now released the sequel, Chelsea Creek to Bunker Hill. It captures the confusion, fear, and excitement of the weeks leading up to the confrontation at Boston. . . . DeMitchell reminds us that the majority of Portsmouth residents at the time were either opposed to a risky war with Britain, or sitting on the fence. . . Her three young Portsmouth protagonists, all British citizens at the time, find their lives ripped apart by current events. The boys, like the stolen gunpowder, are carried into the heat of a battle that changed world history.” — J. Dennis Robinson, The Portsmouth Herald

NE Book Festival 2013 YA Fiction Award!

January 13, 2014–The New England Book Festival has recognized The Portsmouth Alarm as the 2013 Runner-Up in the category of Young Adult Fiction! Visit their website to see a complete list of the festival’s award-winning titles. http://www.newenglandbookfestival.com/winners2013.htmlhdr_newenglandbookfestival

New Hampshire Dept of Ed

“Encourages [students] to draw their own conclusions and to make connections.”

The Portsmouth Alarm Casts Light on the Revolutionary Flame in New Hampshire

“Terri A. DeMitchell, author of the award-winning Olde Locke Beach Mystery series, based in the New Hampshire Seacoast region, has turned her talents in research and curriculum design to write The Portsmouth Alarm: December 1774, an historical novel for young adults ages 10–16 that explores the origins of the American Revolution in New Hampshire. The Portsmouth Alarm is based on true events of that year when the Portsmouth militia stormed the local fortress intended to guard the city from outside attacks and made off with the King’s gun powder and arms, an act of treason from which there was no turning back. The novel is suitable for both individual reading and classroom use, and introduces students to complex events in an even-handed way that encourages them to draw their own conclusions and to make connections between the episode described in the book and other historical and contemporary events.

– New Hampshire Department of Education – Social Studies Resources

A Classroom Teacher’s Reaction

“It was great! It was engaging. It opens the reader’s eyes to the pros and cons of both sides.”
– D. Arabian, 5th grade teacher; Portsmouth, New Hampshire

COMPLETE REVIEW:
It was great! I thought the book brought to life this lesser known incident that led the way to the “shot heard round the world.” It was engaging, and realistically and fairly represented both sides of the issue through the eyes of the main characters. I really liked how it opens the reader’s eyes to the pros and cons of both sides.

It clearly illustrates the moral dilemma faced by many colonists at that time.

For readers who are familiar with the Portsmouth area, there are many connections with the names of the men involved and place names in Portsmouth. I love historic fiction that makes me want to research the topic more fully–which I did after reading this book!

– D. Arabian, 5th grade teacher; Portsmouth, New Hampshire

New Hampshire Magazine

“Enjoyed it immensely.” -Barbara Coles.

Author Terri DeMitchell’s “The Portsmouth Alarm” gives a fascinating fictionalized account of the raid [on Fort William and Mary]…and puts it in the context of the times. The raid is an incident most people know little about and DeMitchell brings it alive.

She wrote the book for young adults but I, a bit older than that, enjoyed it immensely.

Read the whole New Hampshire Magazine article here.

Midwest Book Reviews: Children’s Bookwatch

“The presentation of historical facts allows readers to arrive at independent conclusions and reactions.”

“[The characters] present at least two outlooks on the oncoming conflict; patriot and loyalist, in substantial complexity. The nonjudgmental approach to the presentation of historical facts allows readers to arrive at independent conclusions and reactions. Chronicling a very tumultuous and confusing time in the history of the North America, The Portsmouth Alarm: December 1774 will challenge and engage readers in a re-evaluation of historical foundations, actions, and events.”

Read the entire review at Midwest Book Reviews.

The Bowed Bookshelf

“DeMitchell conveys a marvelous sense of place and time, for even today we are able to visit the buildings she speaks of and can immediately connect to the cold and windy weather.”
– The Bowed Bookshelf: Thoughts on new books, publishing industry

“This novel is an aid for young adults (ages 10-16) to understand the complexity of the issues facing residents in pre-revolutionary America. The drama is quite close and clear to the reader, and gives one a strong sense of history. It could be a useful teaching tool in conjunction with a classroom curriculum module and I thrill to think of the fabulous field trips that can be taken in conjunction with studying this period of history.”

Read the entire review at The Bowed Bookshelf.